No shit, Season 3 of ‘Sex Education’ proves sex is delicious

PLEASE NOTE: This text contains slight spoilers from the third season of “Sex Education”

The third season of “Sex Education” arrives today on Netflix with the credit of remaining as good, maybe even better, than its debut season and the second, both exceptional. The opening scene with couples of all types practicing good old sex sets the tone for what’s to come in the eight unprecedented episodes, which Splash already watched.

The only season (so far) in which Otis’ (Asa Butterfield) sex counseling clinic and Maeve (Emma Mackey) doesn’t work even once is, in fact, the one that most shows the issues raised in the series in a practical way.

No, we’re not just talking about slutty (which is also a little bit, after all, everyone likes it), but the extreme importance of sex education not only for teenagers, but also for adults.

Characters such as former head of the Moordale school, conservative Michael Groff (Alistair Petrie), and his ex-wife Maureen Groff (Samantha Spiro) gain considerable prominence, as does the troubled relationship of Jean Milburn (Gillian Anderson) and Jakob (Mikael Persbrandt).

At the teen core, prepare to understand what’s on Adam’s (Connor Swindells) head and maybe even fall in love with him, who finally gives in to Eric (Ncuti Gatwa)’s charms. Aimee’s (Aimee Lou Wood) friendship with Maeve takes on new contours, and Aimee proves to be one of the most beloved of the series.

cal - Sam Taylor/Netflix - Sam Taylor/Netflix

Cal (Dua Saleh) is a non-binary person in the series and in real life.

Imagem: Sam Taylor/Netflix

Diversity also gains space with issues of gender, transsexuality, accessibility and ageism, all in a light, fun and packed way by a track full of British hits of all times.

It is a delight to discover pleasures together with those who are learning and with hormones racing, as well as watching the stories of those who are rediscovering themselves after years of repression. It’s fun to watch a generation that naturally deals with topics that were once taboo, such as masturbation and the diversity of bodies. It’s nice to understand those questions that no one has the courage to ask, for example, how a person with a physical disability relates sexually and feels pleasure.

casal - Sam Taylor/Netflix - Sam Taylor/Netflix

Eric and Adam form a couple in the third season of ‘Sex Education’

Imagem: Sam Taylor/Netflix

It is also painful to see a forced attempt at regression within the school itself, which “burned its film” last season when it became known as the sex school. For the first time, the series brings another side, such as pro-abstinence speeches, homophobia, prejudice against non-binary people and a forced attempt at unification that proves to be explicitly meaningless .

The fun is watching all this, reflecting, being indignant, and at the same time being able to laugh at the caricature way (always in a good way) of much of the cast and the hints of British humor that guide the series.

From the beginning, “Sex Education” has been able to bring diversity without seeming forced, and even makes a joke about it mid-season. Tip: Pay close attention to Viv (Chinenye Ezeudu), who becomes the student leader of the school.

The third season of “Sex Education” also shows that the series is becoming more and more human. Gone are the typical concerns of high school students, come the issues of adult life. Relationships are hardly perfect, feelings can change quickly, privilege is something you rarely feel, only when it’s taken away from you.

Get ready to have fun and be inspired by the most unlikely fantasies that permeate people’s minds, the collection of porn magazines destroyed by a goat, and Maureen Groof’s reaction when he stumbles upon a huge rubber penis in the drawer. of Jean panties. Why was she messing around there? Makes sense, believe me.

And, for those preparing for the marathon this weekend, a tip: don’t watch episode 5 while you’re eating.

“Sex Education” fulfills what it promises in the title and really educates by showing sex in all its forms, with all its pains and delights. And, as embarrassing as it may seem, believe me: it’s a series for the whole family!

Source link

Leave a Comment